Health

Hazing/Bullying: Duality of Physical Violence

Hazing/Bullying: Duality of Physical Violence

Hazing/Bullying: Duality of Physical Violence

William Jackson, M.Ed.
williamdjackson.com/


The issue of Hazing and Bullying has created a new level
of concern for parents sending their children to college.
The elevated incidence of injuries and harm (physical,
emotional, psychological) and deaths of those falling victim
to the violence that is the result of inflicting suffering and
pain upon another person.

Bullying has many forms from verbal harassment, sexual
assaults (and favors), cyber threats and physical attacks.  
All used to create an environment of fear, trepidation and
compliance to the wishes of the tormentor(s). Hazing is
the execution of psychological manipulation, physical
violence and emotional persuasion to create conditions
of servitude (serving those who execute hazing) and
creating circumstances of acceptance for violence and
humiliation to gain entrance into an organization.

Cartoon Network Anti Bullying TV Program

Cartoon Network Anti Bullying TV Program

Cartoon Network Anti Bullying TV Program

Stop Bullying
http://www.cartoonnetwork.com/promos/stopbullying/index.html

The lethality of words can create psychological and
emotional damage that can span years in a person’s
life. Creating damage to a person’s inner being,
their self-confidence, self-awareness and even the
ability to appreciate their own self-worth.

Understanding Bullying and Violence

Understanding Bullying and Violence

Understanding Bullying and Violence
by William Jackson, M.Edu
http://about.me.williamdjackson

There are growing stories of students from elementary, middle and high
school who experience at various levels bullying; this may come in the
form of harassment and torment at the amusement of one person or
multiple persons.

Vote No on House Bill 4057 to Save PE in Our Middle Schools!

Vote No on House Bill 4057 to Save PE in Our Middle Schools!

The American Heart Association strongly opposes House Bill 4057, by State Representative Larry Metz, removing the requirement for Middle School Physical Education. 

Man-O-Pause


JACKSONVILLE, FL -- It's a common affliction not often talked about.

Some of the same symptoms older women experience during menopause -- affect men.

The main difference: Women experience menopause at a certain age, while men experience hormonal changes gradually, over a period of years.

It's called testosterone deficiency syndrome or andropause, but the most common name used is man-o-pause.

"It's a real condition," explains The Mayo Clinic's Internal Medicine Doctor Vandana Bhide.

Once it's determined a man has had a drop in his testosterone level, doctors examine the patient's other symptoms.

She told the Good Morning Jacksonville team that men usually discuss these changes with a doctor when they notice a lowering of their libido.

However, a man's significant other may notice other changes in him: Mood swings, low energy, sleep problems, and decrease in vitality and exercise tolerance.

Keep Your Ticker in Tip Top Shape at Florida Blue

Keep Your Ticker in Tip Top Shape at Florida Blue

WHAT:  Heart disease is the leading illness affecting Americans, and also one of the most preventable by making simple lifestyle choices.  In celebration of February being American Heart Month, the Jacksonville Florida Blue center wants to help you learn the basics on maintaining a healthy heart with a FREE Health Fair. 

Welcoming members and non-members from 10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m., the Jacksonville Florida Blue Health Fair is offering attendees FREE health screenings including cholesterol and glucose tests, blood pressure measurements and more; FREE one-on-one wellness consultations; and Florida Blue wellness experts will also be on-site to provide advice on how to maintain a healthy heart.  Attendees will also enjoy FREE stress relieving massages and opportunities to win prizes from Florida Blue. 

Additionally, a nurse educator from Baptist Heart Institute will be onsite.

Commonly Used Vitamin Could Help Produce ‘Good’ Cholesterol, UF Researchers Find

 

Maintaining healthy cholesterol levels can keep heart disease, heart attack and stroke away. And a commonly used vitamin could help by increasing production of “good” cholesterol in the body, researchers at the University of Florida College of Medicine-Jacksonville have found. The findings were published recently in the journal Metabolism, Clinical and Experimental.