A local's perspective on the National Cherry Blossom Festival in Washington, D.C. | Families

Title (Max 100 Characters)

A local's perspective on the National Cherry Blossom Festival in Washington, D.C.
A local's perspective on the National Cherry Blossom Festival in Washington, D.C.

This is the 100th Anniversary of the spectacular Spring festival in our nation’s capital.  On March 26, 1912, exactly 3,020 cherry trees in twelve varieties (mostly Yoshino cherry trees) arrived from Japan.   The next day, on March 27, 1912, Mrs. Helen Herron Taft, the First Lady, accepted Japan’s generous gift of natural and everlasting beauty.  Mrs. Taft and Viscoutess Chinda, the wife of the Japanese Ambassador, planted two Yoshino cherry trees on the northern bank of the Tidal Basin.  These two original trees still stand on the bank and at the base of these trees is a large bronze plaque which commemorates the occasion.  In 1912, there were only a few people who witnessed the acceptance of Japan’s gift.  But, this year, our nation’s capital will be flooded with tourists from all other the world who will desire to share the excitement of this 100th Anniversary celebration. 

A century later, the National Cherry Blossom Festival will run for five weeks: March 20th through April 27, 2012.  The cherry blossom trees are a beloved treasure of our nation and such a natural reminder of our friendship with Japan and other nations as well as the mystery and beauty of nature.  Attracting tourists from all over the world, the 100th Anniversary celebration should prove to be both exciting and truly a once in a lifetime experience.

The one question that everyone asks is “when is the best time to go to see the cherry blossoms in full bloom?” The Peak Bloom Date” is defined as the day on which 70 percent of the blossoms of the Yoshino cherry trees that surround the Tidal Basin are open.  Of course, that date varies from year to year, depending on the weather conditions.  While in Florida, we hear reports about the surf conditions.  However, in Washington, D.C., there is always the very latest update on the bloom conditions and predictions on the peak bloom dates.  This year, the peak bloom is reported as March 20th through March 23rd.  These photographs were taken in the early evening hours of Friday, March 23rd at the Tidal Basin, just before the rain started.   

The second question that tourists always ask is “where should I go to see the most cherry trees?”  The cherry trees currently grow in three National Park Service locations:  the Tidal Basin in West Potomac Park in and around the Jefferson Memorial, Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial and the Martin Luther King Memorial; East Potomac Park (Hains Point) and the Washington Monument grounds. 

As an extra added attraction during the celebration, many restaurants in the Washington, D.C., area are highlighting their menus with spring-like and festival-inspired entrees, appetizers, desserts, and cocktails.  Some of the selections may include:  citrus roasted chicken with cherry-infused rice; duck with a sour cherry glaze; double cream cheese cake with a sour cherry glaze; and Japanese Cherry Blossom Margarita.

FOR ADDITIONAL PHOTOS, VISIT http://WWW.MILLERONSPORTS.COM

THIS INFORMATION WAS COMPILED BY RADIO SPORTS TALK HOST AND JACKSONVILLE GIANTS TELEVISION PLAY BY PLAY ANNOUNCER RICHARD MILLER.  AT 26, RICHARD MILLER IS THE YOUNGEST RADIO SPORTS TALK HOST IN THE NATION.  HIS SHOW, MILLER ON SPORTS, AIRS WEEKDAYS FROM 4:00 TO 6:00 P.M. ON AM 1600 WZNZ.  LISTEN TO MILLER ON SPORTS.   “EVERYTHING ELSE IS JUST TALK.”  All photographs and images are the property of Miller On Sports.  ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. 

Photos by:  B.L. Miller

 Listen LIVE on the Internet at:  HTTP://WWW.ILOVETHETRUTH.COM

You can find his videos at the YOUTUBE CHANNEL : http://www.youtube.com/user/milleronsports        

Be sure to LIKEhttp://www.facebook.com/milleronsports

 

Downtown Jacksonville Deals

Downtown Jacksonville Businesses